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Re-using that plastic: Doorstop

Yesterday, I posted about the various steps we can take to reduce our plastic. I promised that I’d provide some upcycling/reuse suggestions. This is the first: you can use plastic jars to make doorstops.

This is actually a commissioned project that I worked on this very morning, so it’s hot off the press.

You will need:

  • A fairly large empty plastic jar, preferably with lid
  • Something to weigh it down with
  • Some kind of covering for the jar
  • Glue or a needle and thread to hold everything together

That’s all a bit vague, isn’t it? Have a read through the rest of the process and you’ll get the idea.

The jar

When I was 10 years old, one of our ‘housecraft’ projects was to make a doorstop. This involved using 4 needles to knit a cover for a 500ml Coke bottle. By dint of (ahem) clever embroidery and the placement of pompoms, the covered Coke bottle was transformed into a (ahem again) ‘beautiful’ Poodle. The bottle was half filled with sand to weigh it down before its Poodle cover was stitched in place.

The thing is, a Coke bottle has a pretty small base, which doesn’t make for much stability. Also 250ml of sand doesn’t weigh a lot, and can’t hold a door in place in the face of a determined Eastern Cape easterly wind. I’m here to tell you that the wind will move the door anyway. The bottle will fall over, and the sand will leak through the knitting and your mother will not be impressed. This is not the desired outcome.

Instead, choose a large jar with a broad base. I chose this one. I didn’t even take the label off. It does have a lid, even though it’s not in the picture. We’ll come back to that.

 

The weight

We have already established that 250ml of sand isn’t going to do the trick. So what is? Well here is why I was so vague before. You could use sand – just more of it. You could use plaster of paris. You could use stones. You could use discarded weight plates from your neglected garage-gym. You could use gold bullion. Heck you could even use water, as long as you have a lid for your bottle. Water weighs 1kg per litre – that’s pretty respectable.

I used plaster of Paris purely because I had some available.

Once you’ve added weight to your jar, you can put the lid on. A couple of pointers here:

  • If you’re using water as your weight, I suggest you seal the lid in place with silicon or hot glue or plumber’s tape or some such
  • If you’re using plaster of Paris, wait until the plaster has set before putting the lid on – setting plaster is exothermic and needs room to breathe

The cover

Now, because this is a commission, I got a bit fancy here. You can do what you like. You could even leave it as it is, if you prefer. Or you could paint it.  Or decoupage it. Or cover it with wallpaper.  You could wrap it in a cast-off item of clothing, knotted at the top.

This is what I did.

  • First, I measured the circumference of the jar (at its widest point)
  • I cut a piece of calico wide enough that it would overlap slightly when wrapped around the jar, and long enough so that it would extend slightly beyond the top and the bottom of the jar. Because I used a piece of calico that had come off one of those pine-and-calico wardrobe thingies, the piece I cut was already hemmed on two sides. Win. If you want to hem yours, go ahead. If not, don’t.
  • I then, you’ll be astonished to learn, covered the jar with the calico. I used hot glue. You could sew yours, and slide the jar in.
  • I folded the top of the calico over the closed lid of the jar and glued it in place. I did the same at the base. You could catch it with a needle and thread, if you prefer.
  • Because I want my client to be able to pick the doorstop up easily, I decided to give it a secure handle. I used some of the tapes from the aforementioned pine-and-canvas wardrobe thingy for this. I cut two lengths that would be long enough to go under the base of the jar like stirrups, with enough left at the top to tie secure knots. I glued the straps across the bottom of the jar, laying them across each other like the strings around a parcel. Then I tied them all together at the top. Note: the are no joins at the bottom – that wouldn’t be secure. I’ll come back to those loose ends in a bit.
  • I cut a piece from a scarf I had picked up from a charity shop. It’s in blues and oranges, with a lovely pompom fringe, and I’ve been dying for an excuse to use it for a project. I cut it long enough so that I could fold it over the base as I had done with the calico, while leaving a cheerful pom-pom-y fringe at the top. The scarf was wide enough to go around the jar and then some, but I didn’t I cut the extra width away, because the more of an overlap there was, the more pompoms there’d be. Win.
  • I wrapped the scarf around the jar. When it overlapped, I just kept going. Then I glued the end in place.
  • I folded the excess over the base. This time I used a needle and thread to catch it all together. Then I cut a circle of calico, which I placed over all that untidiness. Just for a little touch of why-not-ness, I blanket stitched around the edge of the calico circle. I need to make a note about this base. Please see the * at the end of the post.
  • Now for the finishing touches. I gathered the top into a bunch, including the loose ends of the calico tapes, and tied some coloured tape tightly around it like a ponytail. I used the four loose ends of the calico to make two loops, which I stitched (glue might not hold the weight), so that the new owner can hook a finger or two through them to move the doorstop.

And here is the completed doorstop, earning its keep. You can make yours as plain or as fancy as you like. You could give it ears and googly eyes and turn it into a creature of some kind. Let your imagination run riot. Have fun. 

* The base of the jar I chose is concave, which means that it remains stable in spite of the fact that I folded quite a lot of fabric over the bottom and glued it in place. If you’re using something with a flat base, you’d be better off not folding fabric under, but cutting it off level with the base, gluing it in place, and then adding some kind of trim around the bottom.

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